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Dipsie finally launches

dipsie.gif
In a world where everyone is waiting for the next Google, Dipsie has to be one of the most-anticipated search companies in some time. Its founder Jason Weiner - a self-taught programmer - has been written up in several publications. And the Dipsie bot has been crawling the web for more than a year.


So it might surprise some people to realize that Dipsie is finally launching this week not as a search engine, but as a company that helps Web sites get crawled by search engines. The company today is launching a service called DCloak, which helps Web site owners "reveal content that is currently invisible to major search engines such as Google, Yahoo! and MSN." The service is aimed at Web sites with content that's stuck in the "deep web.''

The approach is unique. Imagine a site with content that can't be crawled by a regular search engine, perhaps because its web pages are dynamically generated out of a database. Dipsie takes technology that Weiner has been developing over the last several years and uses it to crawl the hard-to-crawl site. Then the company builds an identical set of static web pages that are loaded onto the Web server and made available to other search engines. In other words, Dipsie takes sites that can't be seen by search engines and builds identical mirror sites that can.

"In cases where page weren't visible, they're now visible,'' Weiner told us at the company's Palo Alto offices last week.

Weiner says he's developed technology that allows him to deal with situations that confound other crawlers, such as sessions, cookies and forms. Weiner also developed a new grading algorithm that he says allows Dipsie to rank Web pages more intelligently.

Weiner's plan is have Web site owners pay - starting at $29.99 a month for 50 pages or less - to have their sites crawled and optimized by Dipsie. Dipsie can also analyze the content of Web sites and suggest keywords for search engine ad campaigns. He's pitching the service to everyone from mom-and-pop Web sites and Fortune 500 companies to "digital ad professionals, SEO consultants and web site managers.''

The company employs about 17 people with headquarters at the semi-famous downtown office building that once housed start-ups Google and PayPal, among others. Weiner resisted VC entreaties for a long time, but finally took $3 million from SVIC. He expects to raise a B round in middle of Q1 next year.

One other note: Dipsie was a Chicago company until recently. But like a lot of start-ups, Weiner realized that he had to be in the valley so he could be in the company of other people who'd built successful companies. The proximity to University Ave. doesn't hurt either. It's a good place to see people and be seen.

UPDATE: Here's the news release.



Comments

Sounds like the same think spammers have been doing for a long time. Cloaking and doorway pages.

Andy Beal on November 22, 2005 8:11 AM
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Never heard of this company until this post.

"In a world where everyone is waiting for the next Google, Dipsie has to be one of the most-anticipated search companies in some time" What? A key word search on the name gives me barely 2 or 3 relevant links (click the tiny url below, shortened to avoid parsing problems). Why do you hype so much? Gosh...

http://tinyurl.com/9enk3

SimplyTired on November 22, 2005 8:12 AM
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Never heard of this company until this post.

"In a world where everyone is waiting for the next Google, Dipsie has to be one of the most-anticipated search companies in some time" What? A key word search on the name gives me barely 2 or 3 relevant links (click the tiny url below, shortened to avoid parsing problems). Why do you hype so much? Gosh...

http://tinyurl.com/9enk3

SimplyTired on November 22, 2005 8:13 AM
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Umm... what they're doing is called search engine spam.

According to Google's own quality guidelines on their site:

"Make pages for users, not for search engines. Don't deceive your users or present different content to search engines than you display to users, which is commonly referred to as "cloaking."

I don't understand why any VC firm would give these guys a dime.

John on November 22, 2005 8:21 AM
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If dCloak = Dipsie's Cloak, he could not choose a better (or worse) name:-)

life is a venture on November 22, 2005 8:54 AM
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I disagree with the notion that a startup has to be in the Valley to be successful. That is no different than saying you have to live in Nashville to be a successful country music artist.

I decided not to move to the Bay because I wanted to be an out-of-the-box thinker.

Actually, I've learned not being Valley-connected is a good thing. I can actually sell/pitch/recruit technology solutions to non-technical people that accurately reflect the mass market.

Ed Dunn on November 22, 2005 9:12 AM
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It is great to be able to run ideas by fellow seasoned entrepreneurs in the Bay Area. Nothing beats a face-to-face meeting. I tried to live away from the Bay Area but I missed its constant tech excitement...

BTW, I had heard of dipsie (and snap and become and blinkx and others).

RAUL

Raul Lopez on November 23, 2005 8:44 AM
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"Maybe it's the location, maybe it's the water, maybe it's just good karma, but there's something about the building at 165 University Ave. that seems to breed successful tech companies."

The Home of Dipsie - Good Luck for the DCloak Job..

Igor

Suchmaschinen News on November 26, 2005 4:50 AM
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Wow, what a useless service and outdated service. A host of companies have been doing this for years, for a moment there in all the hype I thought they'd actually invented something new.

Any big company with sense should employ an enterprise optimisation team to fix the real problem anyway.

teddie on November 28, 2005 7:47 AM
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i've met this guy in Chicago a few times at various functions. he's unbelievably full of himself and doesn't have any reason to be. it doesn't suprise me he had to leave Chicago. that attitude doesn't go over well here.

good luck cloaking!

joey on December 2, 2005 12:10 PM
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So, what has happened to Dipsie? The web site seems to have been dismantled.

Tony on February 16, 2006 6:32 PM
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I have tried to pull up Dipsie but all I come to is a page that says "In steath Mode" Ive checked this for awhile. Seems like Dipsie is Tipsie.

Lisa on May 2, 2006 10:33 AM
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