New report: Uber managers groped, threatened employees

Days after Uber was rocked by accusations that it protected a manager guilty of sexually harassing a female employee, a New York Times report claims problems with the company’s workplace culture extend far beyond that issue.

An investigation published Wednesday uncovered incidents where an Uber manager groped female co-workers’ breasts at a company retreat, a director yelled a homophobic slur at a subordinate during a meeting and a manager threatened to beat an employee’s head in with a baseball bat.

The report by Mike Isaac was based on interviews with more than 30 current and former Uber employees, internal emails, chat logs and tape-recorded meetings.

He says Uber employees had to subscribe to core values such as making bold bets and “always be hustlin.'”

“Yet the focus on pushing for the best result has also fueled what current and former Uber employees describe as a Hobbesian environment at the company,” Isaac wrote, “in which workers are sometimes pitted against one another and where a blind eye is turned to infractions from top performers.”

Uber Chief Human Resources Officer Liane Hornsey told SiliconBeat: “We are totally committed to healing wounds of the past and building a better workplace culture for everyone.”

The damning new report surfaced just three days after a former Uber engineer published a blog post claiming Uber made excuses for and refused to punish a manager who propositioned her for sex and behaved inappropriately with other female employees.

The post went viral and prompted a public outcry.

Uber CEO Travis Kalanick went into damage-control mode, promising outside attorneys would investigate the claims and later apologizing for mistakes during a Tuesday staff meeting.

But it wasn’t enough to prevent the resurgence of the #DeleteUber hashtag on Twitter, and it appears Uber once again is losing users. The Guardian reports Uber is sending users who request to delete their accounts a message referencing the sexual harassment accusations and detailing what the company will do to solve the problem.

Photo: The logo of ride-sharing service Uber is seen in front of its headquarters on August 26, 2016 in San Francisco, California.  (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

 

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  • Thelip95032

    “Uber Chief Human Resources Officer Liane Hornsey told SiliconBeat: “We are totally committed to healing wounds of the past and building a better workplace culture for everyone.””

    This person is responsible for what went down, she should be fired.

  • Jeffrey Fry

    Really not surprised. Travis so arrogant and full of himself that it is hard to believe they have survived this long. Still cannot believe an inherently illegal system has been allowed to thrive.. JMTC

 
 
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