Tesla adds fees to Supercharging network

Tesla revealed new details about plans to charge for electric fill-ups at its Supercharger stations.

The company will begin assessing fees on new vehicles purchased after Jan. 15. New owners will be given 400 kilowatt hours — roughly 1,000 miles — of free fast-charging annually. Tesla figures that amount will give the majority of their customers free charging during all of their long-distance drives.

Tesla CEO Elon Musk said this week expanding the Supercharger network — now 5,000 units at about 800 stations along U.S. highways — is a “top priority.”

U.S. drivers taking more frequent, long-distance trips, will be charged per kilowatt hour or per minute at a charging station, depending on the state and its regulations. California drivers will pay 20 cents per kilowatt hour, equating to a $15 trip from San Francisco to Los Angeles. A cross-country trip from Los Angeles to New York would cost about $120 for fuel.

Older vehicles will still have free fast-charging for life.

Tesla vows the stations will be not become profit centers, but says the pricing will create incentives for drivers to use the service judiciously. For example, the company will assess a 40 cents per minute fee on vehicles parked at charger when its batteries are full.

Tesla has built out their exclusive, fast-charging network to allow Tesla drivers to reach coast to coast on road trips. New Model S and Model X SUVs come with at least 219 miles of range on a full charge.

Other companies are working on high-powered, fast-charging stations that could develop into an alternative, national network to power a growing electric vehicle fleet. Campbell-based ChargePoint introduced plans this month for a 400 kilowatt hour station that could fill up future electric vehicles in as little as 10 minutes.

Electric vehicles today have a maximum charging capacity of about 120 kilowatt hours.

File Photo: Tesla Superchargers (Anda Chu/Bay Area News Group)

 

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  • rick jones

    ampbell-based ChargePoint introduced plans this month for a 400 kilowatt hour station that could fill up future electric vehicles in as little as 10 minutes.

    Electric vehicles today have a maximum charging capacity of about 120 kilowatt hours.

    Those units should be straight kilowatts no?

 
 
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