Apple says it has no gender pay gap in U.S.

Apple, the world’s most valuable company by market value, says it has closed the gender pay gap.

“We’ve achieved pay equity in the United States for similar roles and performance,” the Silicon Valley giant said in its latest diversity report, which it released Wednesday. “Women earn one dollar for every dollar male employees earn. And underrepresented minorities earn one dollar for every dollar white employees earn.”

Saying it examined the issue in the past year and “closed the gaps we found,” Apple joins a couple of other tech companies, Intel and Salesforce, which have also said they pay men and women the same. The company also said it’s looking at pay and other compensation in its worldwide operations and will close any gaps it finds.

Apple’s news comes amid public and private action to close the gender pay gap, including an equal-pay law that kicked in this year in California, and efforts by the Obama administration such as a proposal to require employers with 100 workers or more to report to the federal government what they pay their workers. Achievement of pay parity by one of the most high-profile companies in the world fits in with what Michelle Quinn wrote in February — that real change could come this year because more companies are being forced to take a close look at their practices and do something about it.

The iPhone and Mac maker also reported progress in diversifying its workforce. In 2016, 37 percent of its new hires worldwide were women, up from 35 percent in 2015. Under-represented minorities — which the company identifies as black, Hispanic, Native American, Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander — comprised 27 percent of its new hires this year, up from 24 percent in 2015.

In the U.S., Apple said its new hires in 2016 were 13 black and 13 percent Hispanic, compared with its workforce of 9 percent black and 12 percent Hispanic.

 

Photo: The Apple logo is displayed on a screen at the company’s annual Worldwide Developers Conference at the Bill Graham Civic Auditorium in San Francisco on June 13, 2016. (GABRIELLE LURIE/AFP/Getty Images)

 

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  • Justiceforall2

    Does that include it’s manufacturing operations, suppliers and contractors? And we are supposed to believe them because they are Apple?

  • HarvardSquare Bum

    Very deceptive by using world wide data as a company can hardly hired anyone other than Mexicans in its plant in Mexico. Also, hope the reporter meant 13% and not 13 black:

    The iPhone and Mac maker also reported progress in diversifying its
    workforce. In 2016, 37 percent of its new hires worldwide were women, up
    from 35 percent in 2015. Under-represented minorities — which the
    company identifies as black, Hispanic, Native American, Native Hawaiian
    and other Pacific Islander — comprised 27 percent of its new hires this
    year, up from 24 percent in 2015.

    In the U.S., Apple said its new hires in 2016 were 13 black and 13
    percent Hispanic, compared with its workforce of 9 percent black and 12
    percent Hispanic.

  • P Roppo

    At whose expense were the minority workers hired? More whites, who are already “underrepresented”?
    Why does the media like to ignore the elephant in the room, the gross “over-representation” of Asians? What is that number? Did it grow again, as it did last year, while whites declined?

  • Careful Thinker
 
 
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