Computer programmer: one of the largest gender wage gaps among all professions

Female computer programmers make 72 cents for every dollar earned by male programmers.

That difference is after researchers adjust for factors such as age, education, years of experience, job title, employer and location, according to a new study by Glassdoor, the jobs and recruiting marketplace, which looked at salary data of more than 500,000 people over 140 professions.

The well known U.S. wage gender gap is 76 cents for every dollar men earn. But women earn 94.6 cents for every man’s dollar after adjusting for all factors other than gender. In other words, the wage gap in the U.S. is about 5.4 percent.

The tech industry wage gap was the source of much discussion over at Quartz this month after a post headlined “There is no wage gap in tech salaries” about a new study.

The upshot: For male and female engineers one year after graduation, they make the same amount.

Part of the explanation for the large computer programmer wage gap, said Andrew Chamberlain, chief economist at Glassdoor, is that these are the scientific programmers, “people who would do coding with mainframe computing or other scientific related computing. It’s one of the older profession.”

How do other tech industry professions stack up?

For every dollar a man in this role earns, this is how much a woman makes:

Game Artist – $0.84
Information Security Specialist – $0.85
Data Specialist – $0.76
Software Architect – $0.89
SEO Strategist – $0.90
Front End Engineer – $0.90
Database Engineer – $0.90
Sharepoint Developer – $0.91
SAP Developer – $0.92

On the upside, two professions in great demand show women doing at or better than the national average:

Software Engineer – $0.94
Mobile Developer – $0.97

On the downside, as tech jobs open up in other fields such as health care and media, the gender wage gap increases there, Chamberlain said.

Above: A class of  computer scientists at the start of their summer internships at Silicon Valley tech companies organized by CODE2040, which is dedicated to helping women and minorities break into the tech world. (Photo courtesy CODE2040)



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  • JaredTheGeek

    Except when corrected for education, experience its 5%. What a clickbait headline. Disingenuous.

  • LouisLapierre

    Please, can you give the source of that number. I would like to read the study.

    • thero

      The source is linked in the article.

  • coololcatz

    But women earn 94.6 cents for every man’s dollar after adjusting for all factors other than gender. In other words, the wage gap in the U.S. is about 5.4 percent.

    Yea, thought so.

  • Nathaniel Talcott

    Here are the facts: 1. There are significantly fewer women in Computer Science fields. 2. There is a strong tendency to promote those women ahead of their male counterparts.

    One result of this situation is that the women who remain in low level positions are there BECAUSE they are less competent then their male peers… if they were equally competent or more competent they would have already been promoted. Another result of this situation is that those women who are promoted up the ladder ahead of their male counterparts enter the same positions with less experience.

    The practice of promoting women ahead of men to rectify the pay gap has the perverse result of making the pay gap worse at every level. If we would stop treating women differently then men the wage gap would disappear.

    And please, before you call me a sexist pig, I know I am generalizing… obviously, there are many, many capable women who are promoted and advanced due to merit. Just as obviously, there are many many incapable women who are promoted and advanced beyond their experience.