Top ‘oddball’ job-interview questions, according to Glassdoor

What’s your favorite 90s jam? Who would win in a fight between Spiderman and Batman? These may sound like questions from a Buzzfeed quiz, but they actually could help you land a job at Squarespace and Stanford, respectively.

Glassdoor, the website for job hunters, today released its annual list of top oddball interview questions. It also has a separate Top 10 list for the tech industry, which is known for difficult, sometimes strange questions during the interview process.

The tech industry list was heavy on number problems.

A candidate for an online sales operations job at Facebook fielded this question: How much do you charge to wash every window in Seattle?

To a prospective Redbox employee: How many people flew out of Chicago last year? (From me: I don’t know, but their arms must be tired. Sorry, I couldn’t help it.)

Dropbox asked a candidate: If you woke up and had 2,000 unread emails and could only answer 300 of them, how would you choose which ones to answer?

But also, there were straightforward questions: If you were a Muppet, which would you be, someone was asked by TicketNetwork.

And someone interviewing for a job as a Twitter software engineer was asked: Why is the earth round?

Employers in other industries also posed questions that make you go hmm.

From the overall Top 10 list: Describe the color yellow to somebody who’s blind, Spirit Airlines asked a prospective flight attendant.

And portfolio advisory firm Aksia asked a research analyst job candidate: If you had a machine that produced $100 for life, what would you be willing to pay for it today?

Bay Area-based Glassdoor says its Top 10 lists are based on tens of thousands of interview questions submitted to the site by job candidates in the past year. We’ve also written about Glassdoor’s lists of best workplaces, best CEOs, best places for interns and more.

 

Above: Twitter asked a job candidate why the earth is round. (Illustration from Thinkstock)

 

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  • Paul

    ” If you had a machine that produced $100 for life, what would you be willing to pay for it today?” Well, $100/day, $100/hour, $100 once? Not enough information.

 
 
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