Yahoo publishes its government report on workforce data

Yahoo has added its annual government report on workforce demographics to its post disclosing the ethnic and gender makeup of its employees.

The Internet firm, one of the few run by a woman, joined Google and LinkedIn in releasing the report, known as an EEO-1. It previously made some of its workforce data available, as I wrote about here Tuesday. Yahoo, like Google, broke down its leadership and technical workforce by gender and ethnicity. Yahoo’s disclosure was similar to Google’s: Its workforce is mostly white and male, although it does better or worse than Google in different categories.

Other companies such as Hewlett-Packard, Intel, Cisco and Microsoft also disclose their workforce demographics to some extent. Chegg, an education company, has also released its data.

No company has offered information about the workforce’s age.

Still, the New York Times, in its headline, described Yahoo as joining “tech’s small diversity parade.”

CBS asked if Yahoo is any better at diversity than Google. Fast Company called Yahoo’s numbers “just as grim as Google’s.”

And while transparency is great, it is just the beginning, Fast Company’s Chris Gayomali wrote:

The biggest Silicon Valley giants realize that in order to appeal to the widest swath of customers, you need to include as many different perspectives as possible. Some companies, like Etsy, are proactively trying to increase the number of female engineers in their workforce by setting insanely ambitious hiring goals.

Above: Yahoo’s CEO Marissa Mayer. (Josie Lepe/Bay Area News Group)

Michelle Quinn Michelle Quinn (187 Posts)

Michelle Quinn is a Business Columnist at the San Jose Mercury News. Prior to her current role, she was the Silicon Valley correspondent at Politico covering tech policy and politics. She has also covered the tech industry at the Los Angeles Times and the San Francisco Chronicle. She was a blogger for the New York Times.