Google Glass and a tale of two cities …

Here’s yet another tale of San Francisco, that city torn asunder over tech – specifically, over Google Glass.

Actually, we think some of these tales have been a bit over-hyped.  But you may have heard that some drinking establishments in SF have taken steps to formally ban Glass – whether to protect their patrons’ privacy or simply their delicate aesthetic sensibilities, or both.

You may even have heard that a software engineer named Daen de Leon has launched a website that shows a list of places – about a dozen in SF plus a handful in other cities – that don’t admit patrons who are wearing what some are calling “face computers.”  (We’re linking to de Leon’s site here without vouching for its reliability; it’s too early in the morning to be phoning up taverns and asking about their policies regarding wearable technology devices.)

But not to worry, if you’re a Glass Explorer. You are more than welcome in some other places. The upscale Stanford Court Hotel has let it be known that Glass wearers will be treated to a complimentary drink if they stop by the hotel bar.  (H/T to SFGate.com, which first reported the offer.)

Stanford Court’s Austin Phillips, the hotel’s marketing and sales director, told Silicon Beat that he’s “probably given a few dozen complimentary drinks” to Glass enthusiasts. A group of Glass enthusiasts is planning to show their appreciation by holding a networking “meet-up” at the bar this evening.

“We’re just trying to embrace technology and innovation in the Bay Area,” as part of the hotel’s pitch to both out-of-town visitors and locals, Phillips said. “We want to offer them a place where users can come and feel safe.”

Blogger Matt McGee has been chronicling a lot of these developments over at Glass Almanac, and he’s taken a philosophical view: In a recent post, he noted that de Leon’s site may be useful for Glass owners “to learn what businesses don’t want their money.”

On the other hand, he added, “with Glass still so much of a mystery to the general public and with so much misunderstanding about the device … if I was younger and the type to visit bars, I can’t imagine thinking it would be smart to wear Glass into one.”

(This post was updated at 11:30 a.m. PT to add comments from the Stanford Court’s Austin Phillips.)

(Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

 

 

 

 

 

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  • Vladimir Makarov

    Brandon Bailey I am the first Indian with a google glass, why dont you write some posts about me, i can give you a video on how indians react to google glasses, india has the 2nd biggest population in the world remember, we can promote your blog in return as I have more than 50000 followers on facebook groups and youtube channels, let me know what you think? i can email you my image with the glass if you want

 
 
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