Adobe to donate $300 million in software to schools

Adobe Systems is donating more than $300 million worth of software to help advance digital learning in American schools, part of a $400 million effort pledged to the ConnectED initiative that will be announced by President Obama later today.

The San Jose-based software giant will donate creative products such as Photoshop Elements and Premiere Elements, as well as teacher training resources and administrative software for 15,000 schools nationwide.

“We believe in the power of media creation as a way for youth to express their creativity and build their skills for future success,” Adobe President and CEO Shantanu Narayen said in a statement. “We’re proud to contribute to the President’s ConnectED initiative, and look forward to seeing the benefits that our technology brings to both students and educators.”

In a blog post, Adobe’s senior director of worldwide education, Trevor Bailey, said the donation would help spur creativity and innovation. “Unleashing creativity in all students and teachers is critical as we prepare this generation for the careers of the future,” he wrote. “Today’s students live in an increasingly digital and visual world and must do more than just consume digital media. They must create it in order for their ideas to take shape and their voices heard.”

Filling out the $400 million package, Hungary-based Prezi is donating $100 million in software licenses for its EduPro presentation software.

ConnectED, the White House’s technology-in-education initiative, has collected more than $1 billion in private-sector donations in February alone. Earlier this month, Apple donated more than $100 million in iPads, MacBooks, software and support to ConnectED, part of a $750 million package that included donors such as Microsoft, Autodesk and AT&T.

 

At top: Adobe headquarters in San Jose. Paul Sakuma/AP file photo

Mike Murphy Mike Murphy (336 Posts)

Mike Murphy is a web producer at the Mercury News, and also writes for Good Morning Silicon Valley and 60-Second Business Break.