TechNet gets a new leader to raise its D.C. profile

TechNet, the bipartisan tech advocacy group, announced Tuesday that Linda Moore would be its new chief executive and president, ending a year-long search to replace Rey Ramsey, who left after serving for three years.

Moore is a Democrat with a long history in D.C., where she will continue to be based. She spent eight years in the Clinton White House, serving as deputy policy director in President Clinton’s second term. She also was a senior adviser to Sen. Evan Bayh (D-Indiana) and worked on four presidential campaigns. Most recently she was founder and president of LMF Strategies, a public affairs consulting firm.

TechNet was founded in the mid-1990s to increase the tech industry’s influence in state and federal politics. Since, more tech advocacy and political organizations have emerged, and companies themselves are taking on a larger role in political engagement. That has led some political observers to wonder about TechNet’s ongoing purpose. Two years ago, the organization contemplated and rejected merging with another group that has a bigger lobbying shop, the Information Technology Industry Council (ITI).

Politico called Moore’s appointment “a major shift in strategy” and a “classic Washington play.” “When an association looks to amplify its brand in D.C., it often turns to veteran political operatives with connections on Capitol Hill, an understanding of K Street and an ability to gain respect of member companies,” Politico said.

The organization also announced that Andrea Deveau would be TechNet’s California executive director. She will be based in Sacramento. Deveau worked as senior director of policy innovation and market development at Direct Energy.

Above: Linda Moore, the new chief executive of TechNet. (Courtesy of TechNet).

Michelle Quinn Michelle Quinn (158 Posts)

Michelle Quinn is a Business Columnist at the San Jose Mercury News. Prior to her current role, she was the Silicon Valley correspondent at Politico covering tech policy and politics. She has also covered the tech industry at the Los Angeles Times and the San Francisco Chronicle. She was a blogger for the New York Times.