Tesla teams finish the electric Cannonball Run

Tesla Motors CEO Elon Musk sent out a triumphant tweet Sunday morning: Tesla’s Los Angeles-to-New York City trip, using two Model S vehicles and the company’s network of Supercharging stations, was completed in 76 hours.

The trip comes almost a year after John Broder of the New York Times wrote a highly controversial piece about being “stalled on the EV highway” as he drove a Model S along the East Coast. Musk fired back at the Times with detailed logs about the journey, and public editor Margaret Sullivan ultimately wrote a piece that took Broder to task for errors of judgement.

The cross country trips, chronicled by Hamish McKenzie, a former journalist who Tesla has hired to be its in-house “lead writer,” is aimed to put to rest any lingering concerns among potential customers about the ability of an electric vehicle to take long road trips.

But Tesla’s customers are already doing that for them. John Glenney, a 62-year-old resident of Lexington, Kentucky, was the first to cross the country using the Supercharger network in a road trip that went largely unnoticed until it was complete.

Photo of the team that completed the trip with Elon Musk in front of Tesla’s NYC store. The photo was tweeted by @TeslaMotors Feb. 2. 

 

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  • Mark Bravard

    cool

  • marty1234

    Just wait for a Tesla RV..Free travel and lodging…

    • Mark Bravard

      they had a electric rv in 2009, not tesla ,lol at lest was a start on ev rv .

      • marty1234

        This is where teslas charging system can create a new class of people retiring to the road or families takeing extended summer trips. I think the real value in teslas charging system could be a fundamental change in how people vacation and even more so in Europe where the cost of gas is much higher…
        I

    • sranger

      In a way, you have it now. If you move the seats forward and lower the two rear seats, you get a flat almost 7 foot long floor. Add and air mattress and you have a place to sleep with heat and air and a great entertainment system with internet access. The mobile charger works with the standard 14-50 electrical plugs in most RV parks….

  • VoxPopper

    No mention as to how they failed to meet their record time goal?

    • iceman777

      Probably re-charging time.

    • CGriffin

      Go to Tesla’s blog on their website and read about it. They had an 8 hour delay in Colorado because of a major winter storm that closed the highway. They figured out a detour and continued their trip.

      • rotorhead1871

        joke…….the are getting desperate……..

        • Poplar

          Huh? That’s just a weird comment, RH.

          • sranger

            he means that the Tesla haters are getting desperate and running out of talking point to try and bash the car or the company.

      • hoyt

        They had Gas powered Chase Vans and tow trucks along. Not a Very Impressive STUNT.

        • CGriffin

          Huh??? Just what did you expect them to use for chase vehicles? Tesla hasn’t made electric VANS yet. Wow!

    • sranger

      The record was to set the least amount of time charging, it was not the fastest crossing…

  • sociopathic

    Nice!

    76 hours is only more than 2x than the current record.

    But if one were to take a leisurely jaunt in a 20MPG car, it would cost less than $600. How many trips would one have to take before the purchase of a Tesla S makes fiscal sense?

    • John Frey

      How many trips would it take in a gas car that cost the same price? People buy more expensive cars than the Tesla everyday.

    • grendal

      Buying any new car makes no fiscal sense. Does a Corvette really make fiscal sense? You don’t have to buy a Tesla if you don’t want to. This is just an amazing accomplishment for a new company. They are showing up the old boys by actually accomplishing what those companies said couldn’t be done. If GM or Ford wanted a national charging network they probably would have petitioned the government to help make it happen. Tesla has done it all by themselves except for the loan that they already paid back a year ago. As much as it makes those against electric vehicles angry, Tesla keeps highlighting their vehicles strengths over the traditional gas/diesel powered cars.

    • sranger

      When you compare the Model S to cars in it’s class like the BMW 6/7 series, Porsche Panameria, Mercedes S Class, etc…(Roughly the same price) you get a net return the first time you use a supercharger….

  • rotorhead1871

    ha! the desperation is starting to show…….

  • rickster

    do the same on a bmw series 7 and spend $700 in gas and $1400 on a round trip. EV haters are starting to run out of excuses that this technology doesn’t work. It looks like these guys are being paid to put such imbecile comments. Real people dont hate progress

  • Tom Moore

    The significant development here stems from the common misbelief that there is a limit on how fast batteries can be charged. Most of us assume that big batteries that yield useful road trip ranges will be very slow to charge. Tesla has demonstrated that the largest batteries in production (85 kWh) can be recharged in the time it takes for a pit stop and lunch at a highway rest area. All that is necessary is to beef up the charger to push power at a rate much larger than that used by the car while it’s underway.

    It takes about 12 kW to push a sleek family car through the air at highway speeds on the flat and level. Tesla’s insight was to set up charging stations that can fill the batteries at a rate ten times that, or 120 kW. Presto! practical electric highway travel; and a world record LOW charging time for a transcontinental trip.

    • vamike999

      ohh Tom how little you know. This car is better then anything out there. When i walked into a ford dealership with my bro i could not help but feel everything in there was an antique compared to the Telsa

      • hoyt

        Vamaike; Your missing reruns of the Big Bang Theory & Star Trek.Dream on.

      • Tom Moore

        Huh? I drive a Model S every day and did my first supercharge this weekend. And I agree with everything you said about it compared with other cars. My vanity plate is “1P21GW”… Get it?

    • Randall Smith

      I’m confident battery technology will advance to allow very quick charging. I saw a lab demo recently of a 2 minute charge (not hunting it down). The one thing unclear to me is how to provide the power needed for the super quick charge.

      For instance, say the battery capacity doubles to 170 kwh and we want to charge that in 5 minutes (comparable to gas). That would require 2.04 MEGAWATTS for the 5 minute duration to replenish the 170 kwh battery. Most large power plants produce between 400-800 megawatts to put that in perspective. At the current Model S voltage north of 400V, that would require a current of 5100 amperes. I’m no electrician, but I don’t think that’s feasible.

      This means, even with a battery construction that can accept a 5-10 minute charge, a charging system that can deliver the required current at 400V is not feasible.

      Please do tell me I’m wrong. I want an S. I’m even upset someone beat me to buying the first one in the state (I live in MS). The current tech is acceptable to me (minus some price), but I’m thinking where this will/could go so please no “good enough” responses. How can the power be delivered safely to the future S with a 170 kwh battery in under 10 minutes?

      • Tom Moore

        Good point, or not, perhaps. If battery energy density were to quadruple as hoped for Li-S technology, how long would it take to charge a 320+ kWh battery that is good for 1000 miles? With current superchargers, that would be about 1.5 hours for a half charge. Have you tried driving 1000 miles without a rest of at least 3-4 hours? I claim that the only requirement is to make the charge rate at least 10x the rate at which energy is being used in driving. Then it will always take much less time to charge than to drive. There is currently a city bus being tested in Canada with a 335 kWh battery, and it gets charged overnight.

        • Randall Smith

          I agree a 1000 mile capacity would make charging time less important, but I think you’ve constructed a bit of a straw man argument. If Li-S materializes (and I hope it does), manufacturers will offer lower cost batteries capable of 300-500 miles rather than 1000 miles.

          Even after a 300 mile trip, I like a nice long break. 300 miles is a little more than 4 hours on the interstate. But there are times when people would like to keep going, and not without reason. That 300 miles would require about 100 kwh and a minimum of 45 minutes to charge (closer to 1 hour with end taper on 120 kwh charger).

          A 10 minute charge would require .6 MW, 5 minutes 1.2 MW. I would like to think this is possible. So I’m posing this to those with knowledge in this area. Is it possible to deliver power of this magnitude (~ 1MW or 10 times what Tesla currently provides) and how might it be done?

        • TheSA-X

          hmm… one possible solution would be to store a reserve of excess energy that could be expended just as quickly. that reserve could be recharged at night when there is less traffic

  • Alouisis1

    The network effect of the Tesla charging stations gives them a leg up the competing firms may never overcome.

    • icykum

      Funny thing is, Elon Musk (CEO of Tesla) does not care about being the best, he is open to distributing his technology to other firms. Honda and Audi are allowed to make cars to use his charging stations.

    • hoyt

      A Monopoly will raise the PRICE!

      MOTOR TREND

      The automaker has also revealed pricing for battery
      replacements. Taking the mystery out of the one maintenance detail that scares
      many about electric cars, Tesla says that $8000 will buy 40 kW-hr Model S
      customers a new battery to be installed at any time after the eighth year of
      ownership. The cost rises to $10,000 for the 60 kW-hr battery and $12,000 for
      the 85 kW-hr battery.

      • CGriffin

        And now… the rest of the story. There is nothing saying that you will have to replace your battery after 8 years. It may last longer. Plus, with the rapid advancements in battery technology, in 8 years from now, the range of the replacement battery will likely be much more than the current 265 miles, plus their cost may go down considerably compared to those costs reported by Motor Trend. I think Tesla will end up making extra money on these people who are gambling on the future cost of their replacement batteries.

  • hoyt

    Who would spend $75,000 0n a car that could not win a race against a 1971 Chevy Vega from NY to Pittsburgh?

    • Michael B

      Quite evidently, a lot of people. Anyone who doesn’t know why, or why this is a stupid question, is either willfully ignorant or a moron.

      • hoyt

        Fear not the path of truth for the lack of people walking on it. RFK

        • Naworb McGee

          You are ignorant. NAW

    • Naworb McGee

      Trolls are getting really lazy these days.

      • hoyt

        Children adding to the conversation.Go back to your video games .

        • Naworb McGee

          You just make the same 1971 Vega comment on every article. So lazy. The speed at which you travel from NY to Pittsburgh does not define what is a great car.

    • vamike999

      LOL you dont know much about this car do you lol. it will blow away any car on the road today lol. Go back to you Exxon station

      • hoyt

        Being FAST does not make it a great car, Speed = More Electrons used= shorter range.The batteries will have big problems and short life spans. Your mother once told you Vamike” If its to good to be true your going to get your heart broken and your wallet empted son”.Listen to your mom, I have forgotten more about cars than you know.

        • Randall Smith

          Speed = More Gas used= shorter range.

    • CGriffin

      How about you take your 1971 Chevy Vega and shove it up your -ss!! You post this same dumb comment on every single article you can find about Tesla. STFU and go away troll.

      • hoyt

        CGriffin: The truth is a bitter pill to swallow!

        • CGriffin

          Only your distorted version of it. To us “sane” people, your stupid Vega comment proves no point whatsoever. The Tesla’s EPA-Certified average range of 265 miles is more than enough for 99+% of the time. On the rare occasion that we need to go farter than that, we can just rent an ICE car… or fly there and back instead. Plus, Tesla is currently working on a 500-mile battery pack for their next-generation Model S. Then what will you have to say about your completely irrelevant race from NY to Pittsburgh?

          • hoyt

            Griff: Calm down, have you taken your medications today?

          • CGriffin

            That’s pretty funny coming from the person who has posted the same pointless comment dozens of times!

          • hoyt

            Looks like i got your attention? and the other unemployed welfare groupies surfing the web and dreaming about owning a tesla.Obama is still giving away lots of those electric wheel chairs SIGN UP . OH!you already have one.

          • CGriffin

            I am far from being unemployed. I own a company and also run franchise. I think you must be the welfare recipient who lost everything (including your mind) shorting Tesla’s stock. Oh, you are right about only one thing… I don’t currently own a Tesla. We are waiting to see if the “falcon wing” doors will make it to production on the Model X before we make our decision on which model to buy.

          • CGriffin

            Just what is your anti-Tesla agenda all about anyway? Did you lose too much money shorting their stock? What is it that drives your insanity?

    • grendal

      Let’s really examine this trolls BS argument:

      1971 Vega is a 43 year old car. It’s very unlikely the engine, transmission, water pump, oil pump, gaskets, drive belt, or any other moving part in the car has survived that long. So let’s just say that all those things are miraculously working fine.

      https://www.google.com/#q=new+york+to+pittsburgh+distance

      Vega – very noisy Model S – very very quiet

      Vega – Normal drive time is over 7 1/2 hours, 490.2 miles. 25 MPG on the highway and an 11 gallon tank. So it’ll need one ten gallon fill up. That is 4 minutes.
      Model S – 98 MPGe – 265 miles per charge – Battery swaps are 1.5 minutes and let’s give them two for that distance even though it would probably be one.
      The Model S wins, in comfort, by 1 minute going normal speed limits. Racing is no contest since the Vega only had a top speed of 112 MPH and the top speed of the Model S is 130. The Vega also had a 0-60 of 18 seconds, while the Model S is 4.0 seconds.
      No contest the Model S wins in every situation.

    • RussellL

      Everybody.

      Who would take advice from a person that thinks a Chevy Vega is better than a Model S?

      Nobody.

    • TheSA-X

      Please don’t feed this troll

  • hoyt

    MOTOR TREND

    The automaker has also revealed pricing for battery
    replacements. Taking the mystery out of the one maintenance detail that scares
    many about electric cars, Tesla says that $8000 will buy 40 kW-hr Model S
    customers a new battery to be installed at any time after the eighth year of
    ownership. The cost rises to $10,000 for the 60 kW-hr battery and $12,000 for
    the 85 kW-hr battery.

    • Naworb McGee

      This is old news.

    • CGriffin

      And now… the rest of the story. There is nothing saying that you will have to replace your battery after 8 years. It may last longer. Plus, with the rapid advancements in battery technology, in 8 years from now, the range of the replacement battery will likely be much more than the current 265 miles, plus their cost may go down considerably compared to those costs reported by Motor Trend. I think Tesla will end up making extra money on these people who are gambling on the future cost of their replacement batteries.

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