Easy Rider: father-daughter duo make first coast-to-coast trip in a Tesla Model S

It’s happened: a driver of a Tesla Model S just traveled from New York to Los Angeles using only the company’s free Supercharging stations for fuel.

John Glenney, 62, drove with his daughter Jill Glenney, 26, as his co-pilot. The duo drove in a green Model S named “Ivy” and kept track of their trip using a spreadsheet that they filled out by hand. They left New York January 20 and arrived in Los Angeles Saturday, using 28 Supercharging stations along the way.

“I love talking about the trip, but I’m not that conversant in social media,” said Glenney, who lives in Lexington, Kentucky and spoke by phone Monday morning from Paso Robles. “I’m planning to drive to Fremont today and would love to take a tour of the Tesla factory, but I haven’t heard back from Tesla.”

The groundbreaking trip was unscripted and has largely gone unnoticed outside of the EV community. Other Model S owners have been following the news of the journey at the Tesla Forums page with interest. It sounds like the duo plan to drive to Tesla’s Fremont factory sometime Monday in the hopes of getting a factory tour.

Meanwhile, Tesla CEO Elon Musk has announced via Twitter that two teams from Tesla aim to set a cross-country EV speed record this week. They will depart from Los Angeles on Friday and plan to arrive in New York Sunday. Can’t wait to find out who from the company is on the teams. Personally, I’m rooting for JB Straubel in one car and Jerome Guillen and Gilbert Passin in the other.

Musk himself plans to do his Los Angeles -to-New York road trip with his five sons over their Spring Break.

Tesla has been aggressively expanding its network of Supercharging stations to permit long road trips and address “range anxiety.”  The company now has 71 stations operating, making it possible to enable coast-to-coast travel.

 

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  • leslie

    elon musk is the only real african american we can be proud of,

    • keysmank

      Are you an idiot or just looking for attention.

    • berylrb

      Leslie, I know if there was a delete key you’d use it but since there is not please take a mulligan! For your six likes I repeat what keysmank said…

    • Steve

      I find it hard to believe that you know every African American and find Elon Musk to be the only one with any redeemable qualities. Your post says more about you than it does African Americans, or Elon Musk for that matter.

      • leslie

        Dear Steve! but I think, you are Willy or Leroy and one of the rare monkeys, who is literate. in america you do not have you, with a few exception,  have inbred, stupid, spoiled, uncivilized, violent, negro in a process of degrading the life for everybody,    just watch the evening news,   you’ll see  the disgusting animals in action,    murder,   rape,    robbery   and so forth,    the only good thing    that mostly they kill each other. when Americans, openly will admit that, and not pretend that, there is no problem,    that it is O.K. to live in fear, walking the streets, night or day, then and only then, they can try to fix the problem…….in my country, we have no monkeys and no problems.

        • Steve

          Dear Leslie, I think you are one of the many ignorant and illiterate trolls who surfs the internet, and in spite of constantly digesting articles written in the English language, cannot seem to learn anything about grammar, punctuation, or humanity.

    • jersey_skies

      tool

  • Jim

    At least someone has reported this. Great job. Also from what I read on the forum they were fighting heavy snow fall. They probably could have finished the trip sooner if it wasn’t for the white knuckle driving.

  • Elgeetee

    The writer conveniently forgot to mention… how long was that trip???

    • RussellL

      “They left New York January 20 and arrived in Los Angeles Saturday, using 28 Supercharging stations along the way.”

      • Elgeetee

        6 days. Not bad for a 50cc moped, but for a $80,000+ car… Scam!!!

        • RussellL

          It actually took 5 days.

          Since you are unable to count 5 days correctly, I don’t expect you to see the value of a Model S, let alone be able to afford to buy an $80,000 car.

          • Elgeetee

            Monday +Tuesday +Wednesday +Thursday +Friday +Saturday = SixDays
            My $80.000 buys a real car, not a stupid, trendy crap, with unknown long term defects and harm.

          • RussellL

            5 days.

            “After five days on the road, on Saturday the pair pulled into Tesla’s Superchargers at Hawthorne, Los Angeles, where they were met by a group of Model S owners. The father and daughter had covered a distance of 3,400 miles through 16 states, taking in 28 Supercharger stops along the way. Grand total spent on fuel: zero dollars.”

            http://www.teslamotors.com/blog/first-across-us-supercharger

  • hoyt

    The father followed with the FLATBED tow truck.

    • Marshall Harris

      No, he actually drove in the car…

    • Poplar

      Hoyt – where’s the usual shriek about “the electric pig!”?

  • hoyt

    Give a whole new meaning to the CANNON BALL RUN, The ELECTRON SNAIL!

  • Jared Moore

    This is assuming it doesn’t break/and or burn down.

    • Marshall Harris

      It didn’t… where do you people come from by the way?

      • RussellL

        Short sellers of TSLA that lost more than their shorts.

  • sociopathic

    When an EV gets from ocean to ocean faster than a semi, let us know.

    And we’re talking a fully loaded semi.

    My auto goes from SF to the east coast in 3.5 days (one-half day to reach Reno and then we go). Somehow I don’t think the Tesla is going to be able to do that.

    • Marshall Harris

      It only took 4 days, but hey thanks for playing.

      • sociopathic

        “They left New York January 20 and arrived in Los Angeles Saturday”

        Let’s see. The 20th was a Monday, day 1. Then the 21st is day 2. Then the 22nd is day 3. The 23rd is day 4 Then the 24th is day 5. Then the 25th, the Saturday, is day 6.

        6 days. Thanks for playing.

        I can’t believe people can’t simply count the days in a week.

        • RussellL

          It actually took 5 days.

          Mon to Tues is 1 day. Tues to Wed is 2. Wed to Thur is 3. Thur to Fri is 4. Fri to Sat is 5.

          “I can’t believe people can’t simply count the days in a week.”

          Look in the mirror.

    • RussellL

      From SF to NY is 2,925 miles. How much did gas cost you? Over $500?

      The Model S can do it for free.

      • Jimbo99

        Yeah, but that works out to near +/-100 miles per charge, far short of the 208-270 Tesla claims. Nothing special for an EV, a Fiat 500e gets that and costs a fraction of what the Tesla does. When is Tesla going to back down from giving their charges away fro free to get enough chumps on board ? I mean if Obama/US Govt. gives Tesla taxpayer sponsored charges I expect free gasoline. I wonder if Fiat would give me free gasoline to drive that same route ? Then I could do it for free too.

        • dickerin

          You are getting subsidized gasoline. Now, sit down.

          • sociopathic

            How much is gasoline subsidized? How much is the Tesla?

            Now pipe down.

        • Steve

          Not a cent of taxpayer money goes into the charges. Tesla’s federal loan was paid in full, with interest, 9 years early. Also, the charging stations are being built/converted to use solar power, and sell the excess back to the grid.

        • Steve

          And by the way, my Model S gets up to 265 miles per charge, if i were to run it dry. I have driven it well past 200 on a charge with confidence.

          • sociopathic

            Try it in a real winter. I dare you.

          • Steve

            This is winter. I received the car at the beginning of the ice storm. No worries.

          • sociopathic

            What ice storm? The last time it “snowed” was in December, a Wed/Thu IIRC.

            Again, in a “real” winter.

          • Steve

            Since receiving my car in December, we have had 24 days that the temperature was below freezing. I have driven the car all but 2 days in this time and have had no issues with range. You are arguing against actual experience with conjecture.

          • RussellL

            “In winter much of Norway is usually transformed into a snow-clad paradise.”

            “The lower inland areas, both in the southern and northern parts of Norway, can have very low mean temperatures in winter. Temperatures can reach below -40°F in the inner areas of Finnmark, Troms, Trøndelag and Eastern Norway, even if this does not happen each winter.”
            http://www.visitnorway.com/us/About-Norway/Seasons-and-climate-in-Norway/

            For two months in a row, the top-selling car in Norway has been an electric car. (Yes, the #1 best-selling car of any kind was an electric car in both September and October.) Interestingly, it wasn’t the same car. In September, it was the Tesla Model S that led Norwegian auto sales. In October, it was the Nissan Leaf.
            http://evobsession.com/2-months-electric-car-models-1-car-sales-norway/#RM1VgjJ1q466eiKs.99

        • scott seibert

          How often to you completely run out of fuel before going to a gas station? That’s just ridiculous. It’s better to recharge more often to keep going than run out of charge, just like you don’t want to run out of gas.

          • Jimbo99

            I run it down to maybe a 1/2 gallon give or take in a Fiat 500 Sport at least once a week as my commute is 80 miles per day. I get quite a bit more than 100 miles on that tank of gas regardless of temperature, time of day/year.

      • sociopathic

        $600 IIRC. And it happened in a vehicle that cost less than the Tesla. How many times does a person have to drive cross country to make it economical?

    • Assaf

      @socipathic it will happen this weekend, when the official Tesla team does it :)

  • Jared Moore

    And? Cross country trips have been made a couple of times or so.

    • RussellL

      Using just Superchargers?
      The more people that do it, the more people will see (and hopefully understand) Tesla’s advantage over the competition.

      • Jared Moore

        I’m saying that a cross country roadtrip isn’t exactly impressive anymore(since we’re not in the beginning of the 20th century) unless it’s done in a blistering time(i.e. the cannonball runs)

        • RussellL

          It’s very impressive when done in a Battery EV and on top of that the cost to charge was free.

          It would take more than a week for a competitor BEV to do the same trip in addition to the cost to charge along the way.

          • Jared Moore

            It’s not free, it’s just paid for collectively by the tax payers.

          • Assaf

            Actually, not. Tesla builds the SC network using $2k taken from the price of each Model S sold. Since they already sold ~20k units in the US, they got a big stash to use.

            You can say that the buyers get a $7.5k Fed rebate which is taxpayer money – well that’s barely 10% of the price, possibly less (e.g. the car John and Jill used cost more like $100k).

            Find me a manufacturing company that says it gets less than 10% in tax breaks in one way or another – and I’ll find you a bunch of liars who rig their numbers.

          • Jared Moore

            Besides the rebate, look at all the tax money poured into these EV companies like Tesla and Fisker(which turned out nicely)

          • Steve

            Tesla paid back their federal loan in full, with interest, 9 years early.

          • sociopathic

            Didn’t they refinance the debt with Goldman Sachs?

          • Steve

            No, they paid it off through capital gains accrued through escalating stock prices.

          • sociopathic

            Actually you might want to do research. Musk borrowed a >$100M from GS and also paid back the loan to the Gov’t.

          • Steve

            Musk received a personal loan from Goldman Sachs so he could purchase more shares of Tesla so as not to dilute his stake in the company following the offering of additional stocks. The debt was his own personal risk, and not Tesla’s. In fact, Tesla would have paid off the loan without Musk’s purchase of more stock. His move was just a vote of confidence for his company, a move very few CEOs have been willing to take. For what it’s worth, Musk’s shares have appreciated in value enough that he could pay off his personal loan and keep half the shares if he chose. You might want to do your research before making your claims.

          • Rik

            It’s a federal tax credit, not a rebate. The tax credit allows a taxpayer to keep more of their hard-earned money. It does not come out of the pockets of other taxpayers.

          • sociopathic

            Actually, it does. The Government borrows money to pay down things like debt and to fund programs. If there is insufficient revenue, the borrowing increases and the tax rate also increases for those that pay.

            Hence, someone pays – nothing is free.

          • Rik

            Sociopathic — Does that mean I’ve paid for any deductions or credits that you’ve ever claimed on your taxes? Seriously?

          • sociopathic

            No, you haven’t because I’ve paid more than my fair share in taxes.

            I’m part of the <2% club.

          • Rik

            Oh I see, you are entitled to claim tax credits and tax deductions but the rest of us are not. Got it.

            FYI, I’m also in the <2% club, and have paid a lot of taxes.

  • Homer

    The route sucks!

    • Assaf

      Actually, it goes through some of the most beautiful scenery in the country. Besides, by the end of the year there will be multiple routes. It took Tesla only a year to set this one up, and the station-opening pace has only increased.

      See the plan for the end of 2014, here: http://www.teslamotors.com/supercharger (there’s sliding time bar below the map).

      • Homer

        Let see how many people with Tesla’s cross the country? ! so far. Total of many 25,000 vehicles worldwide? Who is going to use these supercharger stations? Places will learn fast this is waste.

  • David Mead

    This would be great for someone that is retired and who has the time. In my Volvo this trip would use $370 of gas each way plus a $70 oil change. That’s $810.00.

    • dickerin

      My Volvo 960 would require $497 of gasoline for 3,600 miles at 26mpg and $3.59/gallon, plus about half of that $70 oil change.
      The percentage trips in the U.S. that are cross-country trips is something like 0.1%.
      Let’s all recognize that this was a demonstration of new technology.

      • alrui

        Or better yet its a publicity stunt!

  • JB

    What is also cool is that the Supercharger network is designed to use 100% solar and renewable energy and even survive the “Zombie Apocalypse” and Super Storm Sandy.

    http://cleantechnica.com/2013/05/31/tesla-supercharger-network-set-to-expand-dramatically/

  • Jimbo99

    Used 28 supercharging stations for a 2,500 mile road trip. Now we finally get the truth on the fraud that is the Tesla S. That’s 100 miles a charge, not 208 nor 265/270 as claimed ? Granted the charges were free, but there’s going to be a day when Tesla can’t stay in business and they will have to charge, whether it be a superstation or a battery pack swap ? And this taxpayer doesn’t want to provide Tesla owners a free charge every place they go. Not unless they give me free gasoline.

    • Assaf

      Actually, the trip was over 3600 miles long, b/c the first route that opened goes along the Northern Plains, then south from Wyoming to Gallup, NM, then west to LA. By the summer there should be more direct routes.
      http://www.teslawiki.net/supercharger/

      Also, at most stops they arrived their “tank” was very far from empty. But they still needed to charge b/c at present the stations are situated some 200 miles apart for much of the trip.

      That said, under extreme winter conditions the range might drop by 30% or so, which they did experience around Wisconsin. Gas cars, too, are rather far from their peak efficiency in extreme temperatures to either direction.

    • Jeff Fontaine

      Let’s see. If you had done any research you would know the last 20% takes nearly the same amount of time as the first 80%, so its faster to fill up at a lower level more frequently.

      I’d be willing to argue that taxpayers got a much better deal for what they gave to Tesla (and were repaid) than most of the other things our country wastes money on every day. For starters, do you know how much in subsidies and tax breaks the oil and gas industry gets? Ethanol producers? How about WS banks? People who chose to “buy” a house they couldn’t afford? Pork projects? Welfare for people who are working the system? The list goes on…

      Not saying I have one or even think they are worth the money, but you should know what you are talking about before chiming in.

      • sociopathic

        Sorry. For every $0.02 that big oil gets, solar and wind get $1 in subsidies. Try again.

      • Jimbo99

        Kind of irrelevant whether the battery has 20 or 80% to charge from my post, they were charging it every 100 miles or so. I have to figure in this weather they needed the charge and wouldn’t charge the car otherwise ?

        • tpolen61

          “100 miles or so”.. on average. Some stations are 200 miles apart, others are 30.

    • William

      Hey JImbo — we get it. You are against EV cars. Let it rest. So don’t buy one.

    • Ken Grett

      Every true conservative should be supporting EVs and here is why:
      These cars are fueled by domestic resources. Every dime you spend charging an electric car stays here in the United States. As it stands, we spend 350 billion dollars every year importing oil. That alone represents 60% of our trade deficit. On top of that, we spend another 75 billion every year keeping oil lanes open while putting our military at risk. The oil industry is one of the most highly government subsidized industries in this country. We have to find a solution to this immense economic problem. EVs are not a perfect solution just yet, but it’s the best we have right now and it’s only getting better. There is nothing American about driving gas guzzlers and sending massive amounts of our hard earned dollars overseas.

      To point out Tesla specifically, we have an American company at the forefront of a global industry setting the standards for all other automakers to follow. When was the last time an American automaker was at the forefront of anything? We really need to be celebrating this American ingenuity instead of #$%$ on it at every opportunity.

  • Kornatoski

    SInce when is driving across country something new??? …oh now I get it … because it was special because it was in a Tesla … why don’t we all bow done and let’s say it together shall we … “ALL HAIL TESLA” ,,,

    • dickerin

      You still don’t get it.

      But, the rest of us will hail Tesla anyway.

    • BigJimSlade

      “SInce when is driving across country something new?”

      Who suggested that other than you, Korny?

    • btc909

      Or be a fuel pumping sheep, I don’t care.

  • jamesjohn

    Hey jimbo, I own a TMS and get well over 200 miles per charge. I still
    stop at almost every supercharger when I’m roadtripping, because
    “topping off’ takes little time and I don’t mind stretching my legs and
    giving my son a rest. But, the point remains, if you drive
    conservatively (60mph), you get over 250 miles on a charge. If you
    drive 75+ it reduces the range by about 25%. I’ve made trips to Tahoe
    and LA multiple times with no issue.

    Sorry if new things just
    piss you off and you can’t get your mind to either understand nor accept
    new options, but I love the EV future. We are only seeing its start
    and for the vast-vast majority of drivers and trips, 200+ mile range is
    about 3-4 time more than sufficient. Or you can continue to pump
    explosive, CO2 laden fuels into your car. You’re choice.

    As far as being on the taxpayer dime – are you complaining about oil and the billions they get from taxpayers, or only the industries that you struggle to comprehend?

    • alrui

      You still have a carbon footprint from the generation of electricity to charge the car! EV is fine & so is gas/diesel/etc. Youre not saving the planet youre simply using a different type of energy.

      • Ken Grett

        Even if you ignore the potential for electricity to be generated by renewable sources in the future, and just focus on carbon based sources, there are other considerations.
        These cars are fueled by domestic resources. Every dime you spend charging an electric car stays here in the United States. As it stands, we spend 350 billion dollars every year importing oil. That alone represents 60% of our trade deficit. On top of that, we spend another 75 billion every year keeping oil lanes open while putting our military at risk. The oil industry is one of the most highly government subsidized industries in this country. We have to find a solution to this immense economic problem. EVs are not a perfect solution just yet, but it’s the best we have right now and it’s only getting better. There is nothing American about driving gas guzzlers and sending massive amounts of our hard earned dollars overseas.

        To point out Tesla specifically, we have an American company at the forefront of a global industry setting the standards for all other automakers to follow. When was the last time an American automaker was at the forefront of anything? We really need to be celebrating this American ingenuity instead of #$%$ on it at every opportunity.

      • jamesjohn

        alrui, Of course even EVs have carbon footprints, but it is a matter of scale. No one who drives an EV claims to have no carbon footprint, but your position seems to be, “if you can’t eliminate all of the carbon footprint, then we shouldn’t bother.”

        Specifically, turning massive turbines (to generate the electricity that powers my car) whether through the use of wind, hydro, gas or oil are all far more efficient than turning a personal oil driven engine in your car. So yes, there is a carbon footprint with virtually all energy generation, but the impact is far less with electricity.

        • alrui

          Buy & drive what you please, its called freedom & if I still lived in Silicon Valley where I was born & raised instead of in a very rural area I’d likely have some type of alternate fueled vehicle to commute. My mom had one of the first Honda hybrids for her 200 mile round trip daily commute & it was fantastic!

    • sociopathic

      Wrong. Driving to Tahoe as a Bay Area native doesn’t give you any type of street creed for cold weather. Let’s try Consumer Reports: 175 miles.

      http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/news/2013/02/winter-chills-limit-range-of-the-tesla-model-s-electric-car/index.htm

    • Jimbo99

      60 mph on I-95 North of Palm Beach, FL. I’d get run over going that slow. 75+ and 250 miles drops 25%, that’s 80+ miles, 170 miles range. That won’t get me to Daytona Beach, FL from North Miami. I went from Miami to Jacksonville, FL and hit rest stops and rested, as in did as I pleased, no worry about plugging in.

  • Quangsomit

    It is probably easier and faster to drive across the country driving any one of today compact car. This is more like a tour of the Tesla super charging stations. Like people said free charging is cool, and everyone is salivating at the mouth waiting for an “affordable” Tesla so they can drive across the country for free! Well, someone conveniently forgot to mention that there is $2000 or $2500 “fee” to use these charging stations. People that paid for the option but rarely or don’t use it looses out. People that are using the “free” charging privilege are grinning ear to ear but don’t realize that is just their money! Elon Musk is a genius!

    • BigJimSlade

      People didn’t mention a “fee” to use the Supercharger stations because there isn’t a “fee” to use them.

      I hope that helps. Otherwise, BRILLIANT comment.

      • Quangsomit

        At time of purchase, you have to pay $2000 to use Tesla Super chargers if you have the 60kw battery. Tesla included the “free” charger uses if you buy the 85kw battery. Get ready to pay as the bigger battery cost substantially more than the 60kw battery.

        • RussellL

          Can’t afford a Model S or you bought AAPL and missed out on the TSLA run up?

          Lots of new cars come with “free” maintenance and that only last for a year or 2.
          Free Supercharging is for the life of the car that gets passed on to subsequent owners.

      • alrui

        There is no free lunch in life!

  • Erik Olson

    Elon Musk is Tony Stark.

  • scott seibert

    All these haters of Musk are funny. Relax people..no one is taking away your gasoline engines. AND the government is still subsidizing our gasoline so don’t worry we’re still spending tax payer money on you, more than for EV’s in fact. Oil is still king… for now.

    • tpolen61

      Not to mention that we’re curbing the rise in gas prices by driving electric.

      You’re welcome.

      • Mark Bravard

        does not effect gas prices due too opec control of price of crude oil .

        • tpolen61

          Less demand -> supply that goes farther -> prices go down according to supply and demand equations.

          That is, when greed doesn’t corrupt the system.

  • jamesjohn

    As a TMS driver, I can say with no reservation that having an EV has not inhibited my lifestyle at all. The biggest change I’ve experienced is that each night I simply plug Rosebud into the wall and wake up the next day with a full charge, more range than I need, more acceleration than I deserve and the smoothest ride I’ve ever experienced. Part of my acceptance of stopping during roadtrips to top off is justified by the pure joy I have during the ride before and after. Sure I could get there a bit faster with an internal combustion engine, but I’m beyond my days of doing roadtrips as fast as possible and pissing into Gatorade bottles to save 15 extra minutes.

    All in all I front loaded my fuel costs in the price of the car, but that decision has already been made. Now I enjoy my free roadtrips. for example I just took my family down to LA for a v-ball tournament. Stopping added about 90 minutes to a 5 hour base trip and cost me nothing. A trip for 3 down to LA and no cost of transportation. Makes each dinner and drink all the tastier knowing the 4 day trip, all told, was going to cost my family less and $500 including transport, hotel, food and drinks.

    • Mark Bravard

      yes , is good not have pay for reg gas agin .

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    best la too charlotte is i 40 . tesla do i 40 ?

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