Wheelbarrow full of coins

Paying for parking with your mobile phone may not seem like the sexiest business around, but if you spend a lot of time in San Francisco like I do, it’s a godsend. That may be why QuickPay, a startup that’s based (where else?) in San Francisco and helps users (what else?) pay for parking by phone, on Friday announced it had landed $5.5 million in angel funding… some of it from the heads of Chrysler and Ford. Of course, it probably doesn’t hurt that CEO Barney Pell is considered of the smartest computer scientists in Silicon Valley — or that he sold his last company to Microsoft for a reported $100 million.

And, in case you missed these other nuggets:

• DataXoom, a San Rafael company that calls itself ”the first mobile data services provider focused exclusively on enterprise customers,” launched its service and announced a new CEO: Former Virgin Mobile president John Tantum.

• Neil Young launched a new startup. No, not that Neil Young.

• Mocana, a San Francisco mobile security company that named a new CEO a couple months back, has landed a strategic investment from GE Ventures, with Shasta and other priors also in the deal. No terms announced, but I’m told the total raised was $15 million.

• Another cybersecurity startup, San Mateo’s Norse, landed a $10 million Series A from Oak Investment Partners.

• And, two new entrants have joined the Salesforce Mafia, with word that ex-Salesforce CMO Kraig Swensrud  and former SVP Sean Whiteley are launching a new startup called GetFeedback. And yes, it’s snagged angel money from Salesforce and others, although nobody’s saying how much.

Whiteley and I sat down a couple years ago when he was Salesforce’s point person on Startup America, President Obama’s initiative to promote entrepreneurship. Guess all that elbow-rubbing with startups gave Whiteley the fever to do it again.

Peter Delevett Peter Delevett (184 Posts)

Peter Delevett covers startups and venture capital for the San Jose Mercury News. He's been a journalist in Silicon Valley since the dot-com daze.