Robert Hohman, CEO of Glassdoor

When it comes to consumer Internet companies, Robert Hohman‘s had a front seat at some of the best-known. He helped get Expedia off the ground, and after the pioneering travel site bought rival Hotwire, Hohman became the latter’s president. His latest startup, Glassdoor, gives job-seekers the inside scoop on what it’s like to work at nearly 300,000 companies (much, Hohman says, as another Expedia offshoot, TripAdvisor, lets travelers share unvarnished advice about other experiences).

And on Thursday, the Sausalito company announced a $50 million funding round led by Tiger Global Management, the investment firm that’s become increasingly active in Silicon Valley. The infusion roughly doubles the total venture money Glassdoor’s hauled in to date.

Hohman told me  the idea was to raise enough to “materially accelerate internationally” and do the same with his sales team. Glassdoor, like LinkedIn, makes its money from employer job listings, but Hohman said advertisers “absolutely, positively can change no user-generated content on our site.” He did say that several dozen times a day, Glassdoor will get takedown requests from companies being slagged in anonymous employee postings, but “very few” of those requests succeed. “All of our content is vetted by human beings before it goes live,” he added, which must be no small feat considering that the site claims 22 million members.

Perhaps to help thresh all that grain, Glassdoor plans to boost its 200-strong workforce by 50 percent in the coming year, thanks to its new stash of Christmas cash. Prior investors Benchmark Capital, Sutter Hill Ventures, Battery Ventures and DAG Ventures — which led the company’s last round a year ago — also ponied up this time.

Glassdoor’s far from the only valley company hoovering up the dollars. Elsewhere on Thursday, San Francisco data platform provider Trifacta announced a $12 million Series B round led by Greylock Partners and Accel (which I’d call quite the daily double). And Mountain View’s Gridstore, which sells software-defined storage technology, said it had closed an $11 million Series B from Acero Capital, GGV Capital and others.

But the buzziest news item of the day may have been the Wall Street Journal’s report that data-crunching superpower Palantir is set to announce a $58 million round valuing the Palo Alto company at $9 billion. Of course, it was just 10 weeks ago that I broke the story about Palantir’s previous funding round, which weighed in at $196.5 million, according to SEC documents.

Peter Delevett Peter Delevett (184 Posts)

Peter Delevett covers startups and venture capital for the San Jose Mercury News. He's been a journalist in Silicon Valley since the dot-com daze.