Give Apple your tired, your poor, your huddled iPhones yearning to be recycled!

Apple on Friday launched an in-store trade-in program, offering credit for your returned iPhones that can be applied to the purchase of a new product. A version of the program has already been available at Apple’s online store, where your old iPhone will get you credit on an Apple gift card. But in an effort to cast that iconic ecosystem net over its fans, the Cupertino tech giant is now reaching out to you in the flesh with its swap-shop benevolence:

Here’s what CNBC is reporting:

 

 

The company launched the new program on Friday, offering a credit for returned iPhones that can be used toward the purchase of a new one. That’s just in time for Apple’s Sept. 10 event where analysts expect the company to announce a new iPhone.

It’s not surprising that Apple—which already has an online recycling program that lets consumers trade their iPhone for credit on an Apple gift card—would expand into store trades, said Todd Day, senior industry analyst for Frost & Sullivan. “If you look at Apple’s overall business model, it’s not just about the devices but the overall universe,” he said. Offering a competitive trade-in program helps ensure those customers stick around, particularly if they receive a gift card instead of cash, as is the case with Apple’s existing online program.

As Chuck Jones wrote on Forbes’ website, the brick-and-mortar gambit is a smart move by Apple, which is always trying to get us in the door where we’ll hopefully buy more iStuff:

 One of the benefits of an in-store program is that it should incrementally increase store traffic which is always a good situation as it increases the likelihood that the person will buy something. While some people will prefer to use the web to sell their iPhone there will be others that will want to go into a store to make sure it doesn’t get lost or pick up a new iPhone immediately.

Credit: idownloadblog.com

 

 

Patrick May Patrick May (296 Posts)

With more than 30 years on the front line of daily American journalism, I'm currently a staff writer with the San Jose Mercury News, covering Apple and writing people-centric business stories from Silicon Valley.