Gov. Jerry Brown at Intersolar: There's plenty of sun and it's going to take storage

California Gov. Jerry Brown gave a rousingĀ  keynote address Monday at Intersolar, the solar industry conference that has drawn roughly 20,000 attendees to San Francisco this week. Brown, a champion of solar since the 1970s, is increasingly vocal about the urgency of climate change and the need for political, business, church, and academic leadership to rise to the occasion. “The response is feeble compared to the challenge of climate change,” said Brown to widespread applause.

The speech was vintage Jerry. He talked about California’s leadership on renewable energy, building and appliance efficiency and the state’s ZEV action plan, which calls for 1.5 million electric vehicles on California roads by 2025. He talked about population growth, Peak Oil (a myth – there’s plenty of it), that climate change is affecting the food supply.

Brown left before yours truly and her colleagues in the fourth estate could ask any questions about San Onofre, a 50 percent RPS, fracking, the Bay Bridge or anything else.

There were a few interesting nuggets:

“The sun only works for six hours,” said Brown. “Nuclear is four times as long, but it leaves a tail that has to be dealt with.”

“Climate change is not ‘news’ because it’s too slow and happens gradually over time.”

“There’s plenty of sun out there and it’s going to take storage….we have a law in California encouraging storage. We need to bottle sunlight.”

“Some cities charge $1,800 for a solar permit – that’s absurd. We’ll fight that.”

“We have 130,000 solar installations in California; we’re going to get more. I’m going to move aside all the obstacles.”

“The goal is an energy system totally compatible with the rule of nature.”

Dana Hull Dana Hull (246 Posts)

Dana Hull covers clean technology and energy policy for the San Jose Mercury News. She often writes about electric vehicles, the smart grid, the solar industry and California energy policy, from RPS goals to Gov. Jerry Brown's big dreams for distributed generation.