Apple teams with SunPower for Reno data center

We’ve written about Apple’s massive solar farm that is helping to power its data center in Maiden, North Carolina.

Apple, working with Nevada utility NV Energy, is planning to build another solar panel farm next to a data center, and this time it’s for its new data center in Reno, Nevada. Apple has already been building two solar panel farms next to its data center in North Carolina, and this latest solar farm in Reno, called the “Ft. Churchill Solar Array,” shows Apple’s growing commitment to clean power at its new facilities.

Now Apple is once again teaming up with San Jose-based SunPower for another solar farm, this time for its new data center in the Reno Technology Park in Reno, Nevada. Apple is working closely with Nevada utility NV Energy. There have been a lot of reports about this in recent days; credit goes to Katie Fehrenbacher at GigaOm for being first.

The “Ft.  Churchill Solar Array” is  expected to generate approximately 43,500 MWH of renewable energy a year, according to documents filed with the Public Utilities Commission of Nevada. Apple has hired SunPower as its engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) contractor and will be using SunPower’s C7 tracker for the project.

“All of Apple’s data centers use 100 percent renewable energy, and we are on track to meet that goal in our new Reno data center using the latest in high-efficiency concentrating solar panels,” said Apple in a statement. “This project will not only supply renewable energy for our data center but also provide clean energy to the local power grid, through a first-of-its-kind partnership with NV Energy. When completed, the 137 acre solar array will generate approximately 43.5 million kilowatt hours of clean energy, equivalent to taking 6,400 passenger vehicles off the road per year.”

Dana Hull Dana Hull (233 Posts)

Dana Hull covers clean technology and energy policy for the San Jose Mercury News. She often writes about electric vehicles, the smart grid, the solar industry and California energy policy, from RPS goals to Gov. Jerry Brown's big dreams for distributed generation.