Watch out, Union Square. Here comes Apple!

Apparently unhappy with having simply a jaw-dropping store almost dead-center in the heart of downtown San Francisco, Apple now wants to relocate three blocks north to be totally dead-center.

According to  the San Francisco Chronicle, Apple plans to open its new store directly on Union Square, shuttering its nine-year-old outlet at Stockton and Ellis streets. No time or date has been announced yet. But the move into an ever glitzier building on one of the City’s most bustling intersections is classic Apple: just take a look at the company’s amazing store inside Grand Central Station in New York City.

Apple said in a statement that the new spot at Stockton and Post will employ 50 more people than the 350 who now work at its store closer to Market Street.

In a blog post, the Chronicle reported:

Supervisor David Chiu said he hoped the new silver box-shaped computer store and customer service center would “turbo-charge” the Union Square area, which has long been home to many of the city’s high-end retailers.

The new outlet will occupy the space at Stockton and Post streets formerly occupied by Levi’s and be about 45 percent larger than the existing space, though it will include all the same features.

 

In typical company-of-few-words fashion, Apple said in a statement: “We’re thrilled to be working with the City of San Francisco.” The City’s major, Ed Lee, told the Chronicle it was working with the Cupertino tech giant to find more “green measures” and “energy efficiencies” for the new store.

Lee also said he hoped the new location would become the “Bay Area hub” for Apple shopping and customer service inquiries.

He said the increased foot traffic it should bring into Union Square — that of shoppers who can now access the store from Market Street and a nearby BART station — should help bolster business around Union Square.

Patrick May Patrick May (284 Posts)

With more than 30 years on the front line of daily American journalism, I'm currently a staff writer with the San Jose Mercury News, covering Apple and writing people-centric business stories from Silicon Valley.