Quoted: Shoot and share? On new 'smart rifle'

“This kind of technology, in addition to making shooting more fun for them, also allows shooting to be something that they share with others.”

Jason Schauble, president of TrackingPoint, a Texas company that’s selling what it’s calling the world’s first precision-guided firearm.  “You have a smart car you; you got a smartphone; well, now we have a smart rifle,” Schauble told NPR. The rifle, which can cost up to $22,000, has a laser range finder and a ballistics computer. As for sharing with others, it can stream live video and audio to an iPad, and every shot is recorded and can be posted to YouTube or Facebook. It’s also a “smart gun” in the way others have defined one, sort of: The high-tech features that make it so accurate can be passcode-protected, although Schauble says it can still be fired without the code. The smart rifle’s debut comes amid debates about gun control and is an example of a technological advance — 3D printing is another — that makes some of the ongoing political debate and laws moot, as Josh Richman of the Bay Area News Group recently explored.

 

Photo of smart rifle from TrackingPoint

Levi Sumagaysay Levi Sumagaysay (3982 Posts)

Levi Sumagaysay is editor of the combined SiliconBeat and Good Morning Silicon Valley. She also helps take care of SiliconValley.com, the Mercury News tech website. Email: lsumagaysay (at) bayareanewsgroup (dot-com).