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Geez, “Start-Ups: Silicon Valley:” We hardly knew ya.

You can read about the Bravo show’s bitter end here and here.

I guess it’s only appropriate that a show about start-ups would shine brightly, but briefly. That’s often what start-ups do and so a series that was meant to show the world what start-ups are all about engaged in some full disclosure.

Like most TV shows, most start-ups don’t make it.

I can’t say I was a fan, as I let on in a column when the show debuted. But like I told Randi Zuckerberg, one of the show’s backers, when she was gracious enough to compliment the column that eviscerated her show: It’s hard for me to criticize someone for trying to create something.

No, “Start-Ups” was not grounded in Silicon Valley reality at all. Not even grounded in Silicon Valley — taking place mostly in San Francisco. But it’s hard to image that the program shaped the way any thinking person views the valley.

It was a circus, a joke, a stage for some start-up wannabes to strut upon. I can’t imagine the cast even took itself seriously.

And it’s hard to imagine that any of those launching start-ups on the show hurt their careers. One venture capitalist I talked to about the program did say that some investor or potential buyers might object to “the foul language and other shenanigans.” But the valley tends to be pretty forgiving when there is money to be made.

As for Zuckerberg (yes, the sister of Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg), she told me at the time of the debut (in a Twitter conversation) that “Start-Ups” would not be her last act.

She said she had “lots of other non-reality shows in the pipeline, too.” Shows that were “more suited to non-die-hard Bravo fans.”

It will be interesting to see what she comes up with. I’ve got to believe at this point that whatever it is going to be an improvement.

(Photo by Emily Shur/Bravo)

Mike Cassidy Mike Cassidy (173 Posts)

I write about the culture of Silicon Valley for the San Jose Mercury News.