Shuttling San Francisco to Silicon Valley

Do you live in San Francisco but work at Apple, Facebook, Google, or Yahoo? Which shuttle do you take?

SPUR, the San Francisco Planning and Urban Research Association, is a critical organization that focuses on land use, transportation and investment strategies to support urban economic vitality.

On Saturday, SPUR, Stamen Design and a panel of artists, activists and transportation professionals will discuss the future of transportation in Silicon Valley, with a focus on the private shuttle buses that transport a growing number of workers between San Francisco and corporate tech campuses in Silicon Valley. The panel discussion is part of the 2012 ZERO1 Biennial’s hub exhibition, Seeking Silicon Valley.

“Fundamental shifts are underway in the relationship between San Francisco and Silicon Valley,” says SPUR’s website. “Historically, workers have lived in residential suburbs while commuting to work in San Francisco. For Silicon Valley, however, the situation is reversed: many of the largest technology companies are based in suburbs and relatively far from mass transit. Thus, an alternate transportation network of private buses threads daily through San Francisco where a majority of their workforce lives, completing a daily cycle of picking up workers at a series of unmarked bus stops, and then carries them via the commuter lanes of the 101 and 280 freeways to and from their tech campuses.”

What does this flow tell us about Silicon Valley, and the urban environment it feeds? Is San Francisco becoming the new bedroom community for today’s Silicon Valley worker? What are the effects of this alternate transportation network, and can public mass transit remain flexible enough to fulfill changing transportation and commuting needs?”

To register for the free event, which begins at 3:30 p.m. Saturday, go to: http://zero1closingevents.eventbrite.com/#

Dana Hull Dana Hull (220 Posts)

Dana Hull covers clean technology and energy policy for the San Jose Mercury News. She often writes about electric vehicles, the smart grid, the solar industry and California energy policy, from RPS goals to Gov. Jerry Brown's big dreams for distributed generation.