That $7.4 billion deal for Oracle to buy Sun Microsystems will take a little longer to win Department of Justice approval. It seems anti-trust regulators are still scrutinizing how the sale would affect Sun’s Java software platform, which is widely used by IBM and many other companies.

 Oracle, however, is doing its best to downplay any concerns. The company got out in front of the news with a press release late Friday that quoted one of its attorneys, Dan Wall:

“We’ve had a very good dialogue with the Department of Justice and we were almost able to resolve everything before the Second Request deadline,” Wall said. “All that’s left is one narrow issue about the way rights to Java are licensed …”

In slightly more neutral terms, Sun filed a report with the SEC this morning that said the DOJ had issued on Friday a “second request,” or a request for additional information on the deal. The effect of that request is to extend the DOJ review period, Sun explained, adding that it is gathering information to respond to the request.

The Obama administration has been giving a little closer scrutiny to some anti-trust issues, compared with its predecessor, according to some experts. Still, that doesn’t mean the Oracle-Sun deal won’t go through.

Wall said in his statement that the Java issue “is never going to get in the way of the deal. I fully expect that the investigation will end soon and not delay the closing of the deal this summer.”

Brandon Bailey Brandon Bailey (349 Posts)

Brandon Bailey covers Google, Facebook and Yahoo for the San Jose Mercury News, reporting on the business and culture of the Internet.